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Recipes

When it comes to food, we’ve got a wide variety on our plates. California cuisine is as creative and courageous as our wine, the result of a vast array of fresh ingredients, cultural influences and imaginative chefs. It’s fusion at its finest and most flavorful.

All Recipes

When life gives you sweet, California-grown tomatoes, make chilaquiles, a genius use for tortillas that are a few days old. September is the height of the harvest for the meaty plum tomatoes that make thick, flavorful sauce. Resist the temptation to substitute store-bought tortilla chips for the home-fried tortillas; the chips soften too much, and the result is not nearly as satisfying. View recipe →

Welcome guests to your home for dinner with a glass of California rosé and a slice of warm olive focaccia. If you’ve baked the focaccia hours before, you can reheat it quickly in a hot oven, although it’s plenty tasty at room temperature, too. Pack it on a picnic or a hike with your favorite salumi and cheeses. Or adapt the topping to showcase a seasonal fresh vegetable like halved cherry tomatoes or strips of roasted sweet pepper. Adding cooked potato to the dough produces an especially moist and tasty result. View recipe →

Cooking duck breasts slowly, skin side down, helps eliminate almost every speck of fat. After about 20 minutes, the skin will be crisp and the flesh as rosy and tender as a fine steak. A silky port and cherry sauce makes this a restaurant-caliber dish. Serve with wild rice. View recipe →

Everybody loves ramen. The noodles are slippery and satisfying, the broth nourishing, and it’s okay to slurp. Use this recipe as a template for your own inspirations. When asparagus is not in season, substitute spinach or mustard greens. If you can’t find edamame (soybeans), try green peas. A quivering six-minute egg continues to cook in the hot broth and adds richness. View recipe →

Spain’s aromatic pimentón de la Vera (smoked paprika) gives these succulent chicken thighs a deep, ruddy color as they roast on a bed of red onion and sliced Meyer lemon. You’ll want to serve every drop of the lemony, garlicky pan juices. The lemon slices can be eaten or not, as you prefer. View recipe →

This dish requires a lot of olive oil for poaching, but you won’t waste a drop. Use some of the flavorful poaching oil in the salad dressing; strain and refrigerate the remainder for cooking greens or for dressing future salads. The strained oil will keep for a month. View recipe →

Slice this frittata into thin wedges for a passed hors d’oeuvre or serve more generous portions with a tuft of salad as a first course. To dress it up for the holidays, top wedges with a dollop of crème fraîche and California sturgeon caviar. View recipe →

Chances are you’ll find many other uses for this fragrant sweet-tart jam. Enjoy it on a grilled-cheese or ham sandwich or serve it with a cheese or charcuterie board. It’s the perfect complement for fresh goat cheese or a tangy Cheddar. View recipe →

Make Mom’s day with these mini-pizzas and a glass of sparkling wine for Mother’s Day brunch. Store-bought pizza dough makes the project easy, but substitute your favorite homemade pizza dough if you prefer. View recipe →

Ask your butcher to saw the lamb shanks in half crosswise to resemble the veal used for osso buco. Exposing the bone adds body to the sauce and makes it possible to enjoy the bone marrow. However, you can make the dish with whole lamb shanks, if you prefer. View recipe →